117.- It takes two to tango (profesor)

It takes two to tango

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/features/the-english-we-speak/ep-161018

 

Summary

Neil’s doing a partner dance on his own in the studio to help you learn English. Learn an expression which means two people need to accept the blame for a bad situation.

Transcript

Neil
(Tango music playing) Hello and welcome to The English We Speak, I’m Neil and joining me is Feifei…

Feifei
Hi there. In this programme we’ve got an expression that means two people are involved in a tricky situation and both must accept blame and responsibility. Neil, what on earth are you doing?

Neil
Dancing! (Tango music playing)

Feifei
Yes, I can see that but… on your own. You look pretty ridiculous if you don’t mind my saying.

Neil
Well, Feifei, that’s because it takes two to tango!

Feifei
Yes it does take two to tango – and that is our expression for this programme.

Neil
But the meaning’s not as simple as you might think. Let’s listen to some examples and then explain a little more.

Examples
The ref should have sent both players off. I know Smith kicked Cooper but it takes two to tango.

Everyone blames Charlie for their break up but Lizzy was just as bad. It takes two to tango.

They should arrest the dodgy agent as well as the manager. After all it takes two to tango.

Neil
So, as you can see, ‘It takes two to tango’ is used to talk about bad or difficult situations.

Feifei
Yes, it’s used to say that two people – not just one – are responsible for that bad situation.

Neil
(Tango music playing) So, Feifei, won’t you join me for this dance?

Feifei
You’re not exactly a great dancer, Neil. Though, I have to admit, I’m pretty terrible too.

Neil
Who cares?! It takes two to tango!

Feifei
Argh! You stepped on my toes!

Neil
Sorry!

Both
Bye!

 

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